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FM 306 to FM 2673 around Canyon Lake
 

Route Summary

FM 306 and FM 2673 travel around Canyon Lake of the lake’s eastern side. This quick ride is perfect for riders seeking a break from the San Antonio or Austin traffic. There are several places to eat and shop at in Gruene, which you’ll find just a few miles south of this route on FM 306. Gruene, New Braunfels, and San Marcos all offer river floating spots which are perfect for on hot days after you’ve been riding for a while.

This route had fatal and incapacitating crashes between 2010 – 2015. In Texas, drivers are not assigned “at fault” in a crash, but law enforcement can assign ‘factors or conditions’ that contributed or may have contributed to a crash. Multiple ‘crash factors and conditions’ can be assigned to one, some, or all vehicles involved in a crash.

The following tables represent data extracted from the Texas Department of Transportation’s Crash Records Information System (TxDOT’s CRIS).

Safety (2010-2015)
Crashes
Fatalities
Serious Injuries
Top Weather Crash Condition
Top Lighting Crash Condition
Top Road Crash Condition

Crash Narrative Summary

The following list is a summary of the crash events and conditions that have been described by officers investigating crashes along this route. The investigating officer provides his/her opinion of how the crash happened and will emphasize or explain, as necessary, any pertinent facts that are not fully explained elsewhere on the crash report. This section is meant to supplement the above data tables by providing further insight and “clues” into what factors and conditions contributed or may have contributed to crashes along this route.

  • 26% did not have motorcycle license. Not only does taking an approved motorcycle licensing course allow you to acquire a Class M endorsement on your license, it can also save you money on your insurance rates!
  • 42% of crashes along this route occurred along a curve. Look through the curve. Don't get fixated on the guardrail ahead of you, or the car coming up on your left.
  • 47% of crashes were multi-vehicle. Of these crashes, 78% of them had the major factors that contributed to the crash attributed to the motorcyclist. In most of these crashes, motorcyclists failed to control their speed and collided with another motorcyclist.
  • 53% of crashes were single vehicle. In these crashes, motorcyclists were traveling at an unsafe speed, lost control, and departed the roadway. Crashes involved passengers falling off the motorcycle, crashing while trying to avoid a crash that had just occurred, and drifting outside of their lane due to crosswinds.
  • 56% of motorcycle operators were not wearing a helmet. Gear isn't cheap, but it is a lot cheaper than an ambulance ride, skin graft, or an extended recovery period off your motorcycle due to injury.
  • The average BAC of motorcyclists who were riding impaired was 0.134. Successfully riding a motorcycle requires exceptional visual, cognitive and physical skill sets that not everyone possesses. Drinking seriously hinders these skills starting with the first drink.
  • Don’t rely on your horn to save you from a collision, but don’t be shy about using it!
  • Don’t tailgate others! You need to have enough time to not only see that they are braking, but you need enough time to react to it.
  • Motorcycles are harder to see due to their smaller size and there are many human factors that can cause a motorcycle to be missed during a motorists’ check for traffic. Never assume a driver sees you just because they are looking your way.
  • Stopped at a red light? Offset your motorcycle at an angle to the side of the vehicle in front of you that allows the best escape route.
  • While riding in rural areas, use caution while entering an intersection that does not have a signal. Only a small percent of rural crashes involve intersections, but the vast majority of rural intersection crashes occur at unsignalized intersections.

 

 

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